Supreme overload

It seems like the Supreme Court is everywhere lately!

Go to any bookstore and you’ll find a number of recently-published books on the judicial bunch, from ABC correspondent Jan Crawford Greenburg’s “Supreme Conflict,” to CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin’s “The Nine,” to Justice Clarence Thomas’s autobiography “My Grandfather’s Son,” to the Thomas bio penned by Washington Post reporters Kevin Merida and Michael A. Fletcher, “Supreme Discomfort.”

And now, at your corner newsstand you will see our nation’s Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., smiling back at you from the cover of Time magazine, next to a headline that reads: Does the Supreme Court Still Matter?

The answer, according to the article‘s author David Von Drehle, is yes – at least to the nine justices. To most other Americans, not so much.

While much has been written about how divided the Roberts Court is – with its host of 5-4 decisions filled with sharp-tongued dissents – the Time piece suggests that most of the cases decided by this court have little if any effect on most Americans. Unlike the justices’ predecessors who handed down decisions like Brown v. Board of Education, Roe v. Wade and Furman v. Georgia which affected the rights of millions, the Roberts Court has often ruled on “discrete cases that pirouette on a narrow point of law.”

“The Roberts Court so far is better known for making symbolic mountains out of real-life molehills,” Von Drehle wrote.

In a related piece in the magazine, Clarence Thomas told reporter Juan Williams that the Court is one big happy family. “This is a place where rather than hurling aspersions, people will actually sit at lunch and chat and laugh,” said Thomas in one of many interviews promoting his book.

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